Posted by: kiwitravelandtours | August 10, 2010

Australia -Ayers Rock or Uluru

Ayers Rock is also known by its Aboriginal name ‘Uluru’. It is a sacred part of Aboriginal creation mythology, or dreamtime – reality being a dream. Uluru is considered one of the great wonders of the world and one of Australia’s most recognizable natural icons. Uluru is an inselberg, literally “island mountain”, an isolated remnant left after the slow erosion of an original mountain range. It is situated in Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park which is owned and run by the local Aboriginals. The local indigenous community request that visitors respect the sacred status of Uluru by not climbing the rock, as the climb crosses an important dreaming track. Neverthless, climbing Uluru is a popular attraction for a large fraction of the many tourists who visit it each year. A handhold makes the climb easier, but it is still quite a long and steep climb and many intended climbers give up partway up.  Kiwi Travel and Tours recently gained permission to take tour groups into the park,  and the experience of watching sunrise and sunset over Uluru was a visual treat -soft pastels, I had imagined it would be a more aggressive colour scheme.  We’d like to share some of our photos -you can also see Uluru’s neighbour Kata Tjuta in the distance.

This is the side of Uluru that people attempt to walk up

It's steeper than it looks!

Sunrise

It was worth the early rise!

These wander freely in the park

This family lived very near Kata Tjuta

 Nicola

http://www.kiwitravelandtours.com

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